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 Table of Contents  
CASE REPORT
Year : 2021  |  Volume : 2  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 46-47

Inadvertent fall of oxygen cylinder on foot: An uncommon injury during oxygen crisis in COVID-19 wave


Department of Orthopaedics, Government Medical College, Haldwani, Uttarakhand, India

Date of Submission18-Jul-2021
Date of Decision10-Sep-2021
Date of Acceptance12-Sep-2021
Date of Web Publication28-Dec-2021

Correspondence Address:
Ganesh Singh Dharmshaktu
Department of Orthopaedics, Government Medical College, Haldwani - 263 139, Uttarakhand
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jssrp.jssrp_16_21

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  Abstract 


Thirty two year old male presented to us with compliant of fall of an oxygen cylinder over his right great toe while transporting it. There were pain and swelling, for which he later contacted emergency room. Production and transport of oxygen were much-needed step that was palpable in the time of pandemic crisis. Amid the looming and potential oxygen crisis during COVID-19 pandemic, the need for self-sustained oxygen concentrator as safe, low-cost, and easily available solution was advocated for rural India.

Keywords: Covid crisis, home oxygen care, injury foot, oxygen cylender


How to cite this article:
Adhikari N, Dharmshaktu GS. Inadvertent fall of oxygen cylinder on foot: An uncommon injury during oxygen crisis in COVID-19 wave. J Surg Spec Rural Pract 2021;2:46-7

How to cite this URL:
Adhikari N, Dharmshaktu GS. Inadvertent fall of oxygen cylinder on foot: An uncommon injury during oxygen crisis in COVID-19 wave. J Surg Spec Rural Pract [serial online] 2021 [cited 2022 May 22];2:46-7. Available from: https://jssrp.org/text.asp?2021/2/3/46/334045




  Covid Top


The second wave of COVID-19 pandemic has been more devastating in many parts of the world and India, contributing to a significant portion of caseloads and many barriers to curtail the damage.[1] The spread was detrimental in the setting of first wave aftermath, inadequate immunization, infodemics, and lack of robust medical supplies of essential drugs, hospital beds, and oxygen. Production and transport of oxygen were much-needed step that was palpable in the time of crisis.[2] Home-based oxygen care and prolonged symptoms in few cases also contributed to enormous demand and suddenly everyone was enquiring or procuring oxygen for home or hospital. Many a times, oxygen was carried by common people to their destination who have little experience of transporting and handling the cylinders. Slippage or fall of an oxygen cylinder was never this much a potential cause of injuries in normal times.

Unique case

32 year old male presented to us with compliant of fall of an oxygen cylinder over his right great toe while transporting it. There were pain and swelling, for which he later contacted emergency room. There were selling and contusion seen over great toe and nail-bed without any other injury and intact distal neurovascular status. The radiograph of the patient showed an undisplaced fracture of distal phalanx of the great toe, for which buddy-taping was done followed by discharge of nonweight-bearing ambulation and pain medication.


  Discussion Top


Amid the looming and potential oxygen crisis during COVID-19 pandemic, the need for self-sustained oxygen concentrator as safe, low-cost, and easily available solution was advocated for rural India.[3] However, in cases of large hospitals, oxygen cylinders provide sufficient and sustained volume of oxygen they require. There is need to strengthen the primary care centers during ongoing overhaul of healthcare facilities so that these are future-ready. There is also added responsibility of primary care centers to join hands to tackle and contain the menace of misinformation presenting and spreading with viral speed through online portals and social media which aptly is termed “infodemics.” There are also similar efforts seen the world over by concerned citizen to come out and help people tide over crisis with their small efforts and contributions. People have shown intense camaraderie and civic responsibility in arrangement of food, medicines, hospital bed, oxygen cylinders, or concentrators to people around. The social responsibility shown by the people in the times of hardship should be continued beyond the pandemic period for a better grass-root-level healthcare functioning. Cautious handling of medical appliances should be done by nonexpert people, or proper guidelines should be sought in cases of doubt. Prevention, thus, is important to avoid unnecessary problems that compound the already distressed situation.

Declaration of patient consent

The authors certify that they have obtained all appropriate patient consent forms. In the form the patient(s) has/have given his/her/their consent for his/her/their images and other clinical information to be reported in the journal. The patients understand that their names and initials will not be published and due efforts will be made to conceal their identity, but anonymity cannot be guaranteed.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
  References Top

1.
Balsari S, Udwadia Z, Shaikh A, Ghafur A, Kataria S. Contextualising evidence-based recommendations for the second wave of the COVID-19 pandemic in India. Lancet Infect Dis 2021;21:905-7.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Shrestha GS, Lamsal R. Rational use of oxygen in COVID-19 pandemic - Are we doing enough? JNMA J Nepal Med Assoc 2021;59:429-31.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Madaan N, Paul BC, Guleria R. Meeting oxygen requirements of rural India: A self-contained solution. Indian J Public Health 2021;65:82-4.  Back to cited text no. 3
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